Dr Guy Harrison

Dr Guy Harrison

 

Dr Guy Harrison DPsych MTh BACP (Accred & Reg) APS (Snr Accred)

Director of OCSW & Head of Spiritual & Pastoral Care OHFT 

guy.harrison@oxfordhealth.nhs.uk

Guy has worked in specialist palliative care, acute care and mental health care for 20 years and was appointed to his current post at Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust in 2012.  He provides professional and management leadership working collaboratively with senior staff and department leads.  This includes direct clinical work with patients and small group work.  As a trained psychotherapist his work with staff includes one to one support, facilitating staff support groups, reflective practice, mediation and clinical supervision.  He also co-ordinates the Trust staff psychological de-briefing service and has been instrumental in setting up a staff support service to support staff who have experienced bullying or harassment.                                    

Guy has wide experience of education and training including leading, organising and speaking at workshops and conferences.  He has extensive knowledge and awareness of the emotional, psychological and spiritual 3 aspects of wellbeing that are crucial to human flourishing.

In pursuing doctorate studies in psychotherapy (DPsych 2016), Guy’s aim has been to further develop and integrate his experience and knowledge in this field. 

One outcome of his research will be the publication of the book Psycho-spiritual Care in Health Care Practice which will be published by Jessica Kingsley Publications in June 2017.


3 ‘Spirituality, which comes from the Latin, spiritus, meaning ‘breath of life,’ is a way of being and experiencing that comes about through awareness of a transcendent dimension and that is characterised by certain identifiable values in regard to self, others, nature, life, and whatever one considers to be the ultimate.’. Elkins et al (1988).



[1] Spirituality, which comes from the Latin, spiritus, meaning ‘breath of life,’ ‘is a way of being and experiencing that comes about through awareness of a transcendent dimension and that is characterised by certain identifiable values in regard to self, others, nature, life, and whatever one considers to be the ultimate.’ Elkins et al (1988)